The Gothic Arch – a Garden Focal Point

Every day I’m in my garden.  Every day I pick fresh fruits and veggies that I have grown organically.  Every day I visit the hens and most days I let them out of their run area so they can follow me around hunting and pecking for fresh food and bugs to eat.  Every day during the drive home from work I take off my shoes to make that distinction between “professional” time and “personal” time.  Every day I walk barefooted outside connecting with Mother Nature and surveying my accomplishments.  Every day I put my hands on the Gothic Arch and marvel at the sights around me.  Every. Single. Day.

It’s true – my garden and the chickens bring me joy.  I enjoy feeling the sun on my skin and watching the natural progression of my hard work growing.  There’s something good about knowing I can sustain myself as a result of the food I’ve grown.  There’s also a satisfaction knowing I can build something from an idea or from plans.  I appreciate seeing something I’ve built stand up to the task for which it was designed.  Sweat equity is more rewarding for me rather than just opening my wallet. 

In this quest to grow my food organically I first spent a lot of time designing the new garden.  Check out The Raised Bed Veggie Garden 2016 post here for more info.  I wanted a focal point that had purpose and the Gothic Arch we built is exactly that.  The original design came from a post on the Remodelaholic website.  Be sure to scroll all the way to the bottom of their post to see some early photos of my Gothic Arch built from their plans!  If you’re thinking of building an arch for your own use, check out their building plans.  They included a complete parts list and the instructions were easy to follow. 

While I won’t re-invent the wheel here and lay out a new parts list with instructions, I will share a few photos of the procedure.  This ended up being a nice weekend project from start to finish.  The most notable changes I made to the original design from Remodelaholic were the height was increased to 10′ tall and many edges were treated with a detail created from a router.  While the additional detail is not necessary for the function of the arch it does provide a visual interest and makes it look less homemade (not that I would mind that, though).

Due to the very design of the complete garden, no part breaches the ground surface and because of that fact, the arch was attached to two 2′ x 4′ x 2′ high raised garden beds to stabilize it above ground.  As a result of this type of installation, the 10′ tall arch is solid and steady with no movement whatsoever.  Barring hurricane or tornado force winds, the Gothic Arch will be around for many years to come.

Without further adieu, here are some photos during the construction of the Gothic Arch.  Enjoy!

 

Building of the Gothic Arch

Building of the Gothic Arch

 

Building of the Gothic Arch

Panels Ready for Installation

 

Making the Connection

Making the Connection

 

Wired for the Climbing Vines

Wired for the Climbing Vines

 

Finished Gothic Arch

Finished Gothic Arch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *